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What We Do


What We Do

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What We Do


What We Do

A faith-based, woman-focused agency headquartered in the Bedford-Stuyvesant community of Brooklyn, Providence House is built around the use of a unique mentoring model at smaller, congregate transitional housing facilities scattered throughout New York City.

That model has been fashioned upon the religious Sisters who founded and still perform many of the essential duties running the agency. The Sisters live in the same housing with clients, sharing dinners most weeknights, as well as weekends together. Because of this participation by the Sisters in communal life with residents, they are able to regularly provide counsel and act as informal mentors, creating a much more intimate experience than is typical with larger and more institutional rehabilitation efforts.

Providence House focuses its programs and services on two at-risk and underserved populations: women and children who are homeless and women recently paroled from prison. Providence House provides women and children in crisis with shelter, food and security as well as support services to help them transition to independence including: enrolling in education or job training programs, searching for employment, obtaining medical services and finding a permanent place to live.

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Homeless Services Program


Homeless Services Program

Homeless Services Program


Homeless Services Program

HOMELESS SERVICES PROGRAM

We serve some of the more difficult homelessness cases – families requiring more intensive supervision and support than larger shelters can provide. At any one time, more than 100 mothers and children are living in our residences.

We currently operate three congregate residences in Brooklyn,  Queens with a total of 25 units; a 10-unit congregate residence in Westchester County; and a 15-unit Apartment Program in Brooklyn.

Mothers and young children stay an average of about six to eight months in the program. They have experienced episodic disruptions in their lives brought about as a result of living in poverty.  The women may be victims of domestic violence, may have been forced to leave their parents’ home after getting pregnant, or may have been living with a relative who asked them to leave.  In most cases, the women served have usually never had their own apartments or found employment. During their stay with us, the women begin the process of learning those skills needed to live independently and to stay out of the cycle of homelessness.

The social service staff begins to work with all families immediately upon arriving at Providence House; and every family is assessed medically to ensure that they are current with vaccinations and physicals. Case managers work one-on-one with each family to address all obstacles to their ability to live independently and making appropriate referrals for professional help such as mental health screening and anger management.

The staff Employment Specialist works individually with each woman to assist her in all areas related to searching for a job.  The staff Housing Specialist bolsters the employment efforts by simultaneously providing assistance in searching for safe and affordable housing. All of the families benefit from our Aftercare Services: we follow-up with them for up to two years after they leave Providence House. This allows the families to benefit from continuity as they adjust to independent living and gives our staff the chance for early intervention if obstacles should arise such as landlord-tenant problems or loss of employment.

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Re-Entry Program


Re-Entry Program

Re-Entry Program


Re-Entry Program

RE-ENTRY PROGRAM

We have served women returning from incarceration since its founding in 1979 – well over 1,000 women in total. The program now takes place in two congregate residences in Brooklyn. Providence House V in Prospect-Lefferts Gardens provides housing and supportive services for up to four months for 16 homeless women with criminal justice system involvement. Providence House VI in Coney Island is a nine-bed re-entry house for women paroled from New York State prisons. A unique aspect of both residences is the presence of three live-in Catholic sisters who form what is known as the “core community.” They are a resource to the residents in the program, providing a listening ear, informal guidance, and non-judgmental support.

Along with safe shelter and healthy meals, the women in the Re-Entry Program receive self-sufficiency skills training to facilitate the transition to independent living and decrease the likelihood of a return to homelessness or incarceration. On-site case management services are provided to ensure access to all needed services, including substance abuse or mental health treatment, life skills training, household budgeting and financial management, and any parole- or court-mandated services.

The women served also receive the benefit of an Employment Specialist/Job Developer to help them prepare for, find, and maintain suitable employment. After residents have secured employment  and become more financially stable, a Housing Specialist leverages well-developed relationships with landlords and other local housing providers to facilitate the search for an affordable apartment in the community.

Aftercare services are provided for up to one year after women move into permanent housing. Women are individually served, through regular phone contact or in-home visits, as they adjust to employment, secure themselves financially, obtain healthcare, maintain independent housing, and manage other responsibilities. Aftercare contributes to the program’s success in helping participants find and keep jobs, and in turn helps maintain the program’s unparalleled low recidivism rate.

Fewer than 5% of women in Providence House’s Re-entry Program return to prison within a year of release, compared with more than 15% of all women paroled in New York State.

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Permanent Supportive Housing


Permanent Supportive Housing

Permanent Supportive Housing


Permanent Supportive Housing

PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING

We provide 68 units of Permanent Supportive Housing at the D’Addario Residence and Bishop Sullivan Residence in Brooklyn. This housing is available to single adults and families who have histories of chronic homelessness, mental illness, and/or chemical dependence. Additionally, a number of units in both buildings are designated to provide affordable rentals to the general population who meet income guidelines. 

Our affordable supportive housing places great importance on teaching tenants the esential life skills necessary for independent living. Some of these skills to be taught are purely practical, such as cooking, grocery shopping, laundry, money management, job seeking, and job maintenance. Additional supportive services also address the key underlying issues related to substance abuse and chronic medical and mental health problems that may have hindered the development of more basic skills. Both through onsite staff and programs, as well as a continuum of linkages in the community, we offer our tenants real-world opportunities to learn about and experience independence, to be responsible for themselves and their families, and to acquire the essential skills they need for self-sufficiency. Both the D’Addario and Sullivan residences offer community spaces and recreation areas, on-site case management, health and mental health services, computers for residents' use, and social and recreational events. Round-the-clock security is also provided.

In addition to our permanent supportive housing in Brooklyn, a Providence House location in New Rochelle provides permanent, affordable apartments for four families, approximately 14 people.

THE D’ADDARIO RESIDENCE

D’Addario Residence provides 46 affordable/supportive apartments, including 35 studio units and 11 one-bedroom apartments. 40% of these apartments are available to neighborhood residents who meet the low-income criteria. The remaining 60% are reserved for women with histories of homelessness and incarceration who are graduating from transitional housing programs.

The D’Addario Residence is named in honor of two long-time supporters and board members of Providence House, Jim and Janet D’Addario.

THE BISHOP SULLIVAN RESIDENCE

Sullivan Residence’s 22 units are reserved for graduates of transitional housing programs, who have a history of homelessness and incarceration, and who struggle with a disability. Many of the residents are referred from other Providence House programs.

The residence is named for Bishop Joseph Sullivan, who was instrumental in helping Providence House begin and remained a close partner and a tireless advocate throughout our history.

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Partners


Partners

Partners


Partners

Our partners are so important and we accomplish a lot together.

If you are homeless or in danger of becoming homeless:

If you are in need of employment, vocational and education counseling:

If you are a homeless person living with HIV or AIDS:

If you are a person on parole and/or recently released from prison:

If you are a person who is mentally ill and/or chemically addicted (MICA):

If you are a victim of domestic violence:

If you are in need of legal services:

Other websites you may find helpful: